To the editor:

I’m writing this letter to inform the citizens of Brownwood and the surrounding area about an incident that occurred to me with the disTo the editor:

I’m writing this letter to inform the citizens of Brownwood and the surrounding area about an incident that occurred to me with the district attorney’s office.

If you remember back in mid-December of 2007, there was a large drug bust in Brownwood. There were about 20 people on the front page of the Bulletin, one of which had two vehicles financed with me at Giles Trade Lot. I suspected that the law had seized my two vehicles, and they had. So I went the Law Enforcement Center to see what procedures I needed to do to get my cars out. I was informed that would be handled through the D.A.’s office. I then contacted the D.A.’s office and was assigned Ryan Locker, the assistant D.A. He informed me I would be receiving a document from the courts soon, and the vehicles could not be released until I had made a response from the courts. On Jan. 9, 2008, I finally received the documents. On the next day, Jan. 10, I filed my response, letting the courts and the D.A. know that I had registered liens on both vehicles and was requesting that they let me have them back. It was stamped and filed through the district clerk’s office. I never heard back from them. I’m uncertain about the next date, but I estimate about a month from which I made my response, I went to go see Ryan Locker, asking why he had not released my cars to me. The notes totaled about $10,000.

He told me then that the drug suspect who was in jail told Ryan that he had the Cadillac paid for. I told Ryan then that he owned me $3,900, and Ryan said he had to give the drug dealer time to produce receipts showing he had paid in full. All this time, the D.A.’s office and Law Enforcement Center were charging me $10 a day a piece storage on the vehicles, which adds up to $20 a day, plus towing fees which were $200.

Still they would not let me have the vehicles back. One of the cars, which was purchased one month before the bust, had never had a payment made, and they wouldn’t let me have it back then either.

I contact anyone and everyone I could about the incident. Not one person outside the D.A. could believe what they were doing to me. I finally met with Ryan one more time, and I was very upset and about a week later, he said I could get my 1996 Buick out, the one the drug suspect had never paid on, for $1,130 storage fees. They would still not release the 1998 Cadillac because they still believed the drug suspect over me, but they promised me that they would stop the storage fees on it — the same as the 1996 Buick, $1,130 more, a total of $2,260.

About a month after the release of my 1996 Buick, they finally called me and said I could come get my Cadillac back, but it was going to cost me $2,000 instead of the frozen $1,130. I was total in shock. I asked why is it more. Ryan said because it has fancy rims on it and they were charging $870 more because it has those rims. I had to pay it. The final total was $3,130 for both vehicles and about four months of struggle to get them out.

I had at one time written a letter to (District Attorney) Micheal Murray hoping he would help me out some. I heard through the grapevine he didn’t have time to deal with it. Citizens, this is our Brownwood district attorney’s office. I’ve been in business over 35 years, run a respectable business, and this is how they treat you.

Matt Giles

Brownwoodtrict attorney’s office.

If you remember back in mid-December of 2007, there was a large drug bust in Brownwood. There were about 20 people on the front page of the Bulletin, one of which had two vehicles financed with me at Giles Trade Lot. I suspected that the law had seized my two vehicles, and they had. So I went the Law Enforcement Center to see what procedures I needed to do to get my cars out. I was informed that would be handled through the D.A. office. I then contacted the D.A. office and was assigned Ryan Locker, the assistant D.A. He informed me I would be receiving a document from the courts soon, and the vehicles could not be released until I had made a response from the courts. On Jan. 9, 2008, I finally received the documents. On the next day, Jan. 10, I filed my response, letting the courts and the D.A. know that I had registered liens on both vehicles and was requesting that they let me have them back. It was stamped and filed through the district clerk’s office. I never heard back from them. I’m uncertain about the next date, but I estimate about a month from which I made my response, I went to go see Ryan Locker asking why he had not released my cars to me. The notes totaled about $10,000.

He told me then that the drug suspect which was in jail told Ryan that he had the Cadillac paid for. I told Ryan then that he owned me $3,900, and Ryan said he had to give the drug dealer time to produce receipts showing he had paid in full. All this time, the D.A. office and Law Enforcement Center were charging me $10 a day a piece storage on the vehicles, which adds up to $20 a day, plus towing fees which were $200.

Still they would not let me have the vehicles back. One of the cars, which was purchased one month before the bust, had never had a payment made, and they wouldn’t let me have it back then either.

I contact anyone and everyone I could about the incident. Not one person outside the D.A. could believe what they were doing to me. I finally met with Ryan one more time, and I was very upset and about a week later, he said I could get my 1996 Buick out, the one the drug suspect had never paid on, for $1,130 storage fees. They would still not release the 1998 Cadillac because they still believed the drug suspect over me, but they promised me that they would stop the storage fees on it — the same as the 1996 Buick, $1,130 more, a total of $2,260.

About a month after the released of my 1996 Buick, they finally called me and said I could come get my Cadillac back, but it was going to cost me $2,000 instead of the frozen $1,130. I was total in shock. I asked why is it more. Ryan said because it has fancy rims on it and they were charging $870 more because it has those rims. I had to pay it. The final total was $3,130 for both vehicles and about four months of struggle to get them out.

I had at one time written a letter to (District Attorney) Micheal Murray hoping he would help me out some. I heard through the grapevine he didn’t have time to deal with it. Citizens, this is our Brownwood district attorney’s office. I’ve been in business over 35 years, run a respectable business, and this is how they treat you.

Matt Giles

Brownwood