Five microns.


GloGerm ingredients, whether liquid or powder, are created to be the same size as the average bacteria, which measures five microns.


When used in either the powder or liquid-based form, with the use of an ultra-violet light, GloGerm simulates the spread of germs, teaching how quickly and broadly germs can be spread in a short period of time.


Brownwood Middle School’s seventh and eighth grade science teacher Johna Elliott showed her classes the importance of hand-washing as school started up for the 2020-2021 academic year.


Illustrating how bacteria and viruses are transferred, Elliott mixed GloGerm powder with lotion, applying it to her hands, and allowing students to do the same. Throughout the class lesson and discussion, Elliott intentionally touched desks, supplies, the mask on her face, and demonstrated proper sneezing technique with tissues.


At the end of the class, Elliott switched off the overhead lights and illuminated black lights. The room lit up with a bluish hue where the GloGerm had proliferated. Students discovered glowing residue on hands, fingernails, arms, pants, desks, backs of chairs, faces, and masks.


"They were amazed at all the places that were glowing," Elliott said. "This is how easy it is to transfer germs if you do not wash your hands often."


Students learned first-hand the importance of sanitary habits, washing hands, keeping hands away from the face, and practicing thorough cleansing. Whether six feet apart or five microns, students will remember the glow of how much of an impact just one touch can make.


Below: Photos of Mrs. Elliot and inanimate objects that were touched her room throughout the day.